Opiate Addiction

Opiate Addiction

If you’ve been using opioid drugs such as Heroin, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Morphine, OxyContin, Percocet, Lortab, Roxicodone, Fentanyl or others, and you’ve come to a point where you know you can’t go on using, but you can’t seem to stop either, Medication Assisted Treatment may be right for you.

Long-term use of anything is going to force your brain to make adjustments just to keep you feeling “normal.” So when new chemicals are introduced to your brain, your brain makes up for it by slowing down or stopping its own natural production of those chemicals. This is how addiction is developed. We’ve outlined how addiction looks in your brain, how MAT works to correct this, and how recovery is sustained. See the infographics below to understand more specifically the Biology of Addiction and Recovery.

What makes opiate addiction unique and so difficult to manage is where opiate receptors are found in the brain. The “survival” section of your brain—the part that tells you to eat and drink to stay alive—is also the area affected by opiates. Opiate addiction specifically (and successfully) convinces your brain that you need opiates to survive. Once you’ve reached this stage of physical dependence, if you try to stop using you will experience withdrawal symptoms similar to what you would experience if you tried to go without food or water. This reality—the strength of the opiate addiction—is what led to the Opioid Epidemic. 

 
 
 

Addiction

The opiate medication you have taken has physically changed your brain. Let's take a quick look at the biology of addiction. 

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Recovery

The help you need to get your life back is "treatment" - "will power." Let's take a quick look at the biology of recovery.

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Leaving Treatment

Federally-funded studies and thousand of personal experiences consistantly show how to have success in treatment.

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Heroin

Heroin

Treatment for heroin addiction is, in many ways, the same as treatment to other opiate addiction.
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Oxycodone

Oxycodone

Oxycodone replaced Oxycontin as a “mild” pain-reliever, but still possess the same addictive qualities.
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Morphine

Morphine

Morphine is generally administered in a hospital setting to treat moderate to severe pain.
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Percocet

Percocet

Percocet is often prescribed as a cough suppressant and pain reliever. The dangers for abuse, dependency, and overdose are still present.
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Lortab

Lortab

This drug represents one of the most frequently prescribed opiates.
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Hydrocodone

Hydrocodone

Hydrocodone tends to be less potent than some of its other prescription opioid counterparts, but is still highly addictive.
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Roxicodone

Roxicodone

Roxicodone is the brand name for oxycodone.
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Fentanyl

Fentanyl

Widely regarded as a major factor in the recent increase in overdoses, fentanyl is extremely dangerous and addictive.
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